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A prenuptial agreement is a safety net in case of a divorce

When preparing to marry, most California couples are not thinking about what could happen if they divorce at some point in the future. While a divorce is not part of the plan, it is always beneficial to plan for this possibility by drafting a prenuptial agreement. This can act as a safety net, providing financial security for both parties, yet there are many misconceptions about why these documents may be necessary.

A prenup outlines what will happen to marital property and assets in case the marriage ends at some point in the future. Drafting one of these agreements is not a bad omen, nor is it planning on the marriage to fail. In fact, it can help make relationships stronger as both parties will have to speak openly and honestly about their financial expectations and priorities when drafting a prenup.

In many situations, it provides a sense of transparency, helping two parties work together and discuss sensitive matters before walking down the aisle. A prenup is a safety net, not an assumption that a divorce is inevitable. These agreements provide benefits for California couples of all income levels, allowing them to decide what will happen to marital assets in case of a divorce instead of a court.

A prenuptial agreement is a binding legal document, and it’s crucial to have help when drafting and negotiating these terms. This will reduce the chance of a dispute over property in case of a divorce. While a couple may never need their prenup, it can allow both parties to look to the future with confidence.