Rombro & Manley LLP
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Rombro & Manley LLP
Top Certified Family Law Specialists
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Property division: Why would a spouse try to hide assets?

A California attorney who has been hired to help investigate a possible hidden asset scheme might recommend searching in several different places. Achieving an appropriate property division agreement requires full disclosure on the part of both spouses. If one of them has a tendency to be secretive when it comes to finances, it is, perhaps, likelier that he or she might attempt to beat the system by stashing cash or otherwise hiding assets in divorce. 

Some married couples share everything equally when it comes to money and other assets. Nowadays, however, it is also not uncommon for spouses to maintain separate bank accounts and conduct their financial lives independent of one another. Each couple must decide what works best for their relationship. 

Keeping secrets about money may be a sign of an underlying relationship problem. For instance, if a spouse does not trust his or her partner, the temptation to keep financial matters secret or to hide money may arise. If a spouse is concerned about a financial matter, and asks his or her spouse about but is met with anger or a defensive attitude, it may be a sign of trouble. A clinical psychologist who spoke on the topic said that in the average healthy marital relationship, spouses typically feel comfortable being forthright with each other about all aspects of their finances and spending habits. 

In California, a family court judge typically makes decisions based on community property division guidelines. This means that, in most cases, all marital property is split 50/50 between spouses. If a concerned spouse is worried about protecting his or her rights and financial interests, he or she may request experienced legal representation before heading to court.